Scalise says he's a unifier. The current state of the GOP will test that skill

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House Majority leader Steve Scalise emerged from a House GOP Conference Meeting on Wednesday, after his colleagues selected him as their nominee for Speaker.

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House majority leader Steve Scalise leaves a House GOP Conference Meeting on Wednesday, after his colleagues selected him as their nominee for Speaker.

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

His nomination marks a narrow victory over Ohio Rep. Jim Jordan, whose bid had been endorsed by former President Donald Trump. His nomination marks a narrow win over Ohio Rep. Jim Jordan, whose bid had been endorsed by former President Donald Trump.

Scalise’s candidacy is expected to head next to a full House vote though it’s unclear when that vote will take place and whether Scalise can garner enough support from his own party to be elected speaker.

A rising Southern star

Scalise is a native of New Orleans and represents much of the city’s conservative and wealthy suburban areas in the U.S. House of Representatives. Since 2008, he has been representing Louisiana’s 1st District as a member of Congress after winning a special elections to replace Bobby Jindal. Scalise has been the House Majority leader since January. Scalise would be the first Louisianan to serve as House Speaker in American history. Scalise has been fighting to preserve federal flood insurance for years. He’s also fought against rate hikes set by a program that operates under FEMA. For years, Scalise has worked to preserve federal flood insurance, and he’s pushed back against insurance rate hikes, which are set by a program that operates under FEMA.

Scalise’s district is home to Port Fourchon, one of the nation’s leading oil and gas seaports that supplies about one-sixth of the nation’s oil supply. Scalise, a supporter of both onshore and off-shore drilling, celebrated the passage of H.R. The GOP-backed Energy Bill H.R. 1 was passed earlier this year. Its supporters claimed that it would increase U.S. production of energy and lower consumer costs. In a letter sent earlier this month to his GOP colleagues asking for their vote to nominate him as speaker, Scalise praised the House’s passage of the bill as an example of his priorities and leadership style. “

But in a letter sent earlier this month to his GOP colleagues asking for their vote to nominate him as speaker, Scalise touted the bill’s House passage as an example of his priorities and leadership style.

“I have a proven track record of bringing together the diverse array of viewpoints within our Conference to build consensus where others thought it impossible,” he stated in the letter.

Disavowing David Duke’s “baggage”

Before he arrived on Capitol Hill, Scalise served more than three terms as a state lawmaker in Louisiana’s legislature.

During that time, he spoke as a guest to the European-American Unity and Rights Organization — a white supremacy group founded by former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke. Scalise’s association with the group, founded by former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke, came back to haunt him in Congress. He apologized, saying that he was unaware of the controversial history. As he looks to move into the No. Stephanie Grace, a Louisiana political writer, recalled a young Scalise describing him as “David Duke, without the baggage.” In a column that received renewed attention on X (formerly Twitter), Grace recalled a young Scalise describing his self as “David Duke, without the baggage.” Grace mentioned in an interview that Duke was from the same part of Louisiana as Scalise. Grace pointed out that when Scalise said that comment back in the 1990s, Duke had just lost a runoff for Louisiana governor. She suggested that Scalise was probably trying to appeal to conservative voters who supported Duke. I don’t think any of that. She believes Scalise intended to suggest that, while he agreed with Duke’s dislike of affirmative actions and entitlements he did not share his racism or anti-Semitism. Many have condemned the comments since they were resurfaced. South Carolina Republican Rep. Nancy Mace said on CNN, Wednesday: “I personally can’t vote for someone that attended a conference of white supremacists and compared him to David Duke.” If I did that, I would be doing a disservice to my constituents in South Carolina. “

Grace, who supports Scalise’s bid for speaker, characterizes him as a “conservative guy” who supports a lot of mainstream conservative policy, including opposition to affirmative action and efforts to keep same-sex marriage illegal.

“He’s always had very strong conservative feelings, but he has also had real friendships with Democrats and people who are not like him,” Grace said. Grace said that he has always had strong conservative feelings, but he also made real friends with Democrats and people who are not like him. “

Louisiana Rep. Steve Scalise tosses the ceremonial pitch before a baseball match at Nationals Park in Washington D.C. on October 6, 2017.

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Louisiana Rep. Steve Scalise tosses the ceremonial first ball prior to a baseball match at Nationals Park in Washington D.C. on October 6, 2017.

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Scalise is very familiar with adversity

Scalise’s relationship with Cedric Richmond, a former Democratic Congressman from New Orleans, is often cited as an example of this bipartisanship. Richmond and Scalise were both in the Louisiana Legislature as well as in Congress, and they are often referred to as “the bayou brother.” Richmond, a senior adviser for the Democratic National Committee who declined to comment on this story, is now a member of the Democratic National Committee. Richmond, who was a senior advisor for the Democratic National Committee, declined to comment on this story. Richmond had previously defended Scalise when he was criticized for speaking with a white supremacy organization. Richmond said that Scalise doesn’t “have a racist bone in his entire body.” It is still unclear whether Scalise will be able to garner the support needed to succeed McCarthy. Scalise narrowly defeated Jim Jordan in the Republican Conference nomination vote held on Wednesday. In 2017, a gunman shot the congressman during a baseball practice for the congressional team in Alexandria, Va. In his letter asking colleagues to support his nomination, he referred to that experience by saying “I strongly believe this Conference has a family feel.” In 2017, when I was shot, it was members of this Conference that saved my life. … It was the thought of returning to work with you all after nearly 15 weeks in the hospital that motivated me to get well. Scalise was diagnosed with blood cancer in August. He has since said that the cancer has “dropped dramatically” – he credits chemotherapy treatments. He has since said that the cancer has “dropped dramatically” crediting chemotherapy treatments.

By all accounts, however, Scalise remains determined to remain in D.C. and move up in the House.