Missouri's strict abortion ban could change. Even a GOP-led group thinks it should.

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Jamie Corley is pictured in her University City, Mo. On Sept. 27, Jamie Corley said that the strict abortion ban in Missouri is “draconian.” Corley, who is a Republican, believes that adding exceptions to rape or incest should not be partisan.

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Its only exceptions are for medical emergencies that threaten the life of the pregnant person. Its only exceptions include medical emergencies that endanger the life of a pregnant woman.

Like most Missourians Jamie Corley was shocked. She went on to create the Missouri Women and Family Research Fund in order to enshrine some abortion protections into the state constitution.

Corley’s not the only one who has done this. Many abortion rights groups and advocates have mobilized in order to secure protections for states that ban abortion.

But Corley, unlike many of the public opponents to Missouri’s abortion ban, is a Republican. She worked for GOP legislators in Washington, D.C. for years. Corley stated, “I am a Republican but this initiative is neither Republican nor Democrat.” “Whether they are pro-life or pro-choice they can support what we’re trying to do. “

Mann Elementary School, in South St. Louis, will be the place where voters go to vote on March 7, 2023. If enough signatures are collected, an abortion initiative is likely to be on the ballot for 2024 if supporters collect enough signatures.

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Corley’s organization submitted six ballot initiatives to establish abortion exceptions for fatal fetal anomalies, incest or rape, if someone called into a crisis line. Some iterations would allow abortions up to 12 weeks of pregnancy, and all would prevent the state from punishing those who receive or perform abortions.

“It’s dangerous to be pregnant in Missouri,” Corley said shortly after filing her petitions to the Missouri Secretary of State’s office. This is not a fear-mongering or hyperbolic statement. Women are suffering from medical problems that seem impossible because they were unable to access the necessary care due to draconian laws on abortion. “

She is optimistic that by taking the issue directly to the voters in 2024, her initiatives may be on the ballot. Missouri voters can amend the state constitution with a simple majority on a ballot measure. She said, “I don’t think that most Republicans want to see an abortion ban.”

Christine Mathews, president and pollster at Bellwether Research in Virginia, says there are data that support this. Matthews, who spoke with Corley regarding polling but was not paid by her organization to do so, conducted a recent survey on states that have strict abortion bans, including Missouri.

Matthews stated that “state legislators who don’t support exceptions for cases of rape or incest” are out of touch with their constituents. “70% of Missourians say that abortion should be allowed in cases of rape or incest. This is roughly the same as what we found in all these states that have a strict ban on abortion. Matthews claims that recent history has been on the side abortion rights supporters. “What we are finding is that in red states when the abortion issue is on an independent initiative – as it was in Kentucky, Montana and other places last cycle – voters supported the reproductive rights position. “

In 2020, voters in all states that directly voted on abortion rights will support measures to protect those rights and reject initiatives that would jeopardize them. Abortion rights activists are determined to continue this trend.

The Central West End clinic of Planned Parenthood of the St. Louis Region and Southwest Missouri no longer provides abortion services. This facility was the only abortion provider in Missouri prior to the fall of Roe v. Wade

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The clinic was the last abortion provider in Missouri before the fall of

Roe v. Wade

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. The facility was the last abortion provider in Missouri before the fall of Roe v. Wade.

Brian Munoz/St. Louis Public Radio

One of the petitions does not mention a viability limit, or things like parental consent, funding for abortion services, etc. One petition does not mention a viability limitation, or things like parental consent and funding for abortion services.
Bill Eigel, R, Weldon Spring, Missouri, State Senator, announced on September 8 that he was running for Governor. Eigel has argued against allowing exceptions to Missouri’s abortion ban.

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Bill Eigel, R, Weldon Springs, Missouri State senator, announced on September 8 that he is running for governor. Eigel has spoken against allowing exceptions to Missouri’s abortion ban.

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Corley, a Republican State Senator and Missouri gubernatorial candidate Bill Eigel has expressed no interest in carving out exceptions. Republican State Sen. Bill Eigel, who is also a Missouri gubernatorial contender, has expressed no interest in carving out exceptions.“The fundamental belief of the pro-life movement is that all life is precious,” said Eigel. If we abandon that fundamental, foundational belief, we will no longer be the pro-life state we claim to be. Other abortion rights supporters argue that Corley’s proposal is not comprehensive enough and are pushing for ballot measures more expansive than hers.
On June 23, Dr. Colleen McNicolas, Chief medical officer for Planned Parenthood of the St. Louis Region & Southwest Missouri was pictured. She said that efforts to restore abortion access should be aimed at restoring “equitable, just and scientifically-based access to all Missourians.”

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Dr. Colleen McNicholas is the Chief Medical Officer of Planned Parenthood of St. Louis Region & Southwest Missouri. She was pictured on 23 June saying that efforts to allow abortions should aim to restore “equitable, just and scientifically-based access” for all Missourians. “

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“Yes, the majority of women are getting abortions early in their pregnancy,” Dr. Colleen McNicolas, chief medical officer at Planned Parenthood of the St. Louis Region & Southwest Missouri, said. There are many reasons that people might need access to abortion after 12 weeks. She emphasizes that the government shouldn’t be making decisions about whether or not someone should be allowed to continue a pregnancy. She also questioned why someone should have to call into a crisis hotline in order to get access abortion services. Schwarz’s remarks are “disappointing,” Corley said, adding that survivors of incest and rape “don’t get to decide the outcome of their pregnancy.” She’s also said her organization believes exceptions require a reporting element to be effective.

She says proposals that broaden abortion access beyond adding exceptions may have trouble gaining traction in a state like Missouri, which voted solidly for Donald Trump in 2016 and 2020, and has a history of electing officials who oppose abortion rights.“These initiatives have to pass with the majority of voters in Missouri,” Corley said. This is the only possible way to expand abortion in Missouri. “
‘Gumming up the process’

Another hurdle abortion rights advocates face is Republican elected officials who are trying to make it harder for any abortion-related initiative to make it onto the ballot or pass. It’s still unclear which initiatives will be circulated to gather signatures, whether they are from Corley or another group. Corley’s proposals will receive ballot summary text soon, but the more extensive proposals are still entangled in a lengthy legal battle.


Andrew Koenig (R-Manchester), pictured in Jefferson City on Jan. 18, said that he is in favor of “stuffing” the system to stop abortion-related items from being placed on ballots in 2024.


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State Senator Andrew Koenig (R-Manchester), pictured in Jefferson City, Mo. on Jan. 18, said that he supported “gumming up the process” to prevent abortion-related items from reaching voters in 2024.

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“I support clogging up the process,” stated state senator Andrew Koenig. Koenig is a Republican and supported the bill which ultimately banned the majority of abortions in Missouri. I don’t want to put any abortion-related measure to a vote in Missouri, as that life is of importance to this state. These moves have angered abortion rights supporters, such as Koenig’s colleague Senator Tracy McCreery. The St. Louis County Democrat said that the tactics showed Missouri Republicans’ lack of confidence in their ban being able to survive a popular vote. “Pro-choice activists will make this issue to the ballot box, but it’s going to take a lot of work.” “